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How To Archive Adobe Experience Manager Website Content For Compliance and Litigation Readiness

Adobe Experience Manager (AEM) as a cloud service comes with a few native tools for short-term back-ups and version control. But if you’re looking to create a legally-admissible, compliant archive of your AEM website content, Adobe itself warns that these features are, “not intended as an audit log or for legal purposes.”

What's the Difference Between a CMS Backup and an Archive?

Building websites used to require a lot of time, knowledge, and manual coding. But with today's sophisticated content management systems (CMSs), building and managing a website is much easier. While customizing features may require technical know-how, the general rule is that most websites are built and powered by an intuitive and user-friendly CMS. However, CMSs were not expressly designed for archiving data. Storing CMS data requires more than hitting save when updating a page. A CMS is not an archive system; your website data isn't necessarily automatically saved in versions—nor is the backup data easy to access. That means you may struggle to identify and access the backed-up data you want to access. Hence, it's best to have a system dedicated to archiving and backups.

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