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5 Online Record-Keeping Tips for Fast-Tracked Compliance in Any Industry

Running an organization comes with many exciting and challenging phases. While there are many processes to put in place as new levels of growth are reached, learning how to keep records of your online properties is crucial early on in the game. As experts in website and social media archiving, we thought we’d share 5 essential record-keeping tips, easily applicable to any industry.

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  1. Brush up on your industry's recordkeeping rules
    It’s your job to ensure compliance with your industry’s recordkeeping regulations to avoid painful fines and a tainted reputation that can impact your business for a very long time. Read up on the regulations impacting you and keep regular tabs on rule updates to make sure you’re not missing any details you could end up paying for later. 

    Check your industry’s regulations here.

  2. Understand the limitations of screen-shots and CMS backups 
    Learn the difference between the reliability and validity of screen shots as opposed to actual archives of online content. As many regulations and courts demand records in WORM (write-once-read-many) format, invest in an archiving solution that offers the ability to replay your content as it once was. 

    Read more on these limitations here.

  3. Make a plan for capturing your social media communications 
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    Consider what solution you need in place for capturing your social media communications, whether the messages are public or private. Make sure to invest in a solution that is capable of archiving content on all the channels you use, including your corporate / collaborative social media.

    Read more on social media archiving here.

  4. Learn the importance of capturing metadata
    When considering what archiving solution to go with, make sure you look for one that captures website and social media metadata. This data is extremely essential and valuable in court cases; and capturing it is a demand by many regulations.
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    Read more on the importance of metadata here. 

  5. Make your data readily available for an audit
    Auditors, citizens and third-party collaborators can request records of your online activity without warning. In any case, be sure to have your content readily available and quickly exportable upon request using a system that makes the process easy.

    PageFreezer offers easy exports as well as content sharing through public access URLs. Learn more here.

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How Schools Can Manage Official Social Media Accounts and Protect Student Privacy

With many schools boasting large and active communities, it’s unsurprising that social media has become a  popular tool in education. Social media platforms offer an engaging way to share information and connect students, parents, and teachers. A Facebook page or Twitter account makes it easy to inform everyone that school has been closed because of snow, remind parents of important upcoming events, or simply celebrate the latest team win. 

The Best Way to Place Social Media Data on Litigation Hold

With so many people active on social media these days, it’s hardly surprising that posts and comments on platforms like Facebook and Twitter often feature prominently during legal matters. This means that legal professionals have an obligation to protect relevant social media data from spoliation, but the challenges that come with these modern information sources extend far beyond willful destruction of evidence.

Social Media Evidence Spoliation and Preservation

No case better illustrates the risks of social media spoliation than Lester v. Allied Concrete Company. The plaintiff had lost his wife in a tragic vehicle accident and was suing for wrongful death. Unfortunately, some Facebook photos came to light that his lawyer was afraid would prejudice the case, and he consequently told his client to delete them. “We do not want blow ups of other pics at trial,” an email from the law firm read, “so please, please clean up your Facebook and MySpace!”