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5 Online Record-Keeping Tips for Fast-Tracked Compliance in Any Industry

Running an organization comes with many exciting and challenging phases. While there are many processes to put in place as new levels of growth are reached, learning how to keep records of your online properties is crucial early on in the game. As experts in website and social media archiving, we thought we’d share 5 essential record-keeping tips, easily applicable to any industry.

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  1. Brush up on your industry's recordkeeping rules
    It’s your job to ensure compliance with your industry’s recordkeeping regulations to avoid painful fines and a tainted reputation that can impact your business for a very long time. Read up on the regulations impacting you and keep regular tabs on rule updates to make sure you’re not missing any details you could end up paying for later. 

    Check your industry’s regulations here.

  2. Understand the limitations of screen-shots and CMS backups 
    Learn the difference between the reliability and validity of screen shots as opposed to actual archives of online content. As many regulations and courts demand records in WORM (write-once-read-many) format, invest in an archiving solution that offers the ability to replay your content as it once was. 

    Read more on these limitations here.

  3. Make a plan for capturing your social media communications 
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    Consider what solution you need in place for capturing your social media communications, whether the messages are public or private. Make sure to invest in a solution that is capable of archiving content on all the channels you use, including your corporate / collaborative social media.

    Read more on social media archiving here.

  4. Learn the importance of capturing metadata
    When considering what archiving solution to go with, make sure you look for one that captures website and social media metadata. This data is extremely essential and valuable in court cases; and capturing it is a demand by many regulations.
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    Read more on the importance of metadata here. 

  5. Make your data readily available for an audit
    Auditors, citizens and third-party collaborators can request records of your online activity without warning. In any case, be sure to have your content readily available and quickly exportable upon request using a system that makes the process easy.

    PageFreezer offers easy exports as well as content sharing through public access URLs. Learn more here.

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