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Pagefreezer Adds Single Sign-On (SSO)

Pagefreezer recently added single sign-on (SSO) as a way of logging into the Pagefreezer dashboard. This means that customers making use of an identity and access management (IAM) solution—like ADFS, OpenAM, Okta, or Ping Identity—can now use it to access their Pagefreezer accounts.

Pagefreezer adds Single Sign-On (SSO)Pagefreezer decided to add SSO as a way of signing into our solution because it provides customers with three major benefits:

  • Improved security: Organizations using an SSO solution only have one centrally-managed set of user credentials to deal with. This makes it much easier to force compliance with the organization’s security policies (for example, password length and complexity). In addition, only having one set of credentials cuts down on instances where employees share passwords, simply reuse the same ones (around 73% of passwords are duplicates), or leave them in public view on Post-it Notes
  • Easier administration: Organizations with more than 1,000 employees typically employ over 200 SaaS applications. Needless to say, provisioning users, configuring settings, and managing access permissions across all these apps can be expensive and time-consuming. SSO allows admins to manage parameters in one place at one time (for example, when an employee leaves, one action is taken by an admin to remove them from all 200+ applications). SSO also cuts down on the possibility of user error that can occur when configuring thousands of users across hundreds of different SaaS applications. Lastly, ongoing maintenance is reduced. For example, IT can spend less time helping users recover forgotten credentials. 
  • Reduced login friction: Just as provisioning users and managing access permissions across hundreds of apps can place a lot of pressure on IT, juggling dozens of different credentials can also be a major source of frustration for users—which is why passwords are so often reused. SSO provides a far better experience for SaaS users. If they are logged into their Identity Provider (IdP), they are automatically logged in on all SaaS applications. This greatly reduces login time and allows the user to only have one set of credentials to access all applications. 

Like other SaaS solutions, Pagefreezer faces the challenge of keeping user accounts secure while also attempting not to make the login process too cumbersome; advanced security features like two-factor authentication (2FA) are great, but they do increase the time it takes to log into an account. Single Sign-On is one very effective way of balancing security and user experience. 

Pagefreezer supports SSO via SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language). To learn more about Single Sign-On and general security at Pagefreezer, simply request a call with one of our solution advisors below. You can also learn more on the Pagefreezer Security Page.

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Michael Riedijk
Michael Riedijk
With more than 20 years of experience building successful technology companies in Europe and North America, Michael Riedijk is recognized as a leading innovator in compliance technologies. Originally from The Netherlands, Michael relocated to Canada and launched Pagefreezer in 2010.

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